Friday, June 22, 2018

Uncle Sam Vintage Wood Sign

uncle sam vintage wood sign, red horse signs




One can't wave the American Flag too much. Celebrate the Fourth of July year round with Terri Palmer's patriotic salute to Uncle Sam and America, Land of the Free, Home of the Brave.





Traditions Home celebrates the holiday year round at Robyns Lake House, a getaway for all our woes and cares. Vintage sign by Red Horse Signs.



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Tuesday, June 5, 2018

The Stickley Difference

The Stickley Difference 


At Stickley, skilled artisans create timeless works of art from nature with loving hands, careful attention to detail and an eye for everlasting beauty.





The process is a long.

It reflects Stickley’s adherence to the ancient Flemish maxim, Als ik kan, to the best of my ability, and the more ancient Roman proverb, Ars longa, vita brevis, the art is long, life so short, which is often interpreted to mean that the artist's skill is long to learn and his life too short.

The art of building beautiful furniture stretches from beginning to end. Wood is carefully selected, cut, and kiln-dried. Time-honored techniques are used by artisans. These techniques include pinned mortise and tenon, dove-tails, lap planking, tongue and groove, and plank matching, techniques long lost to most manufacturers. Finally, each piece is finished in one of Stickley’s hand-rubbed rich stains.

Stickley selects natural wild cherry from the Adirondacks, wood that ages beautifully and takes on a rich patina. Many of Stickley’s Mission pieces are made of native white oak, quarter-sawn to generate ray flakes and bind more solidly the wood’s fibers, creating a sturdier and more beautiful piece of furniture. Stickley Mahogany Classics are made of mahogany from Honduras, cut so that the environment is protected and nourished.


View all the Stickley Collections

 

The Difference


Unique Stickley design, painstaking craft and attention to detail and construction, a unparalleled history, this is what makes the Stickley difference.



Sunday, January 28, 2018

What is a beautiful thing?

What is beauty, does it exist and why? 


 Shop for floral prints online


A florist finds beauty in a floral arrangement, a lover in a single rose, a naturalist in the smell, a child in a fresh picked daisy, the old find beauty in the daffodil as pokes its yellow head through the snow, the forlorn find beauty in the dainty violet pressed between the pages of a book, a cynic says its crazy, that we find beauty at all.

For beauty is not something we can not touch and must be something to behold.



I confess I love to walk in the park in early spring and if by chance I spy the tiniest violet in bloom along the side of the path I walk, I smile. It is a thing of beauty, to be appreciated for its own sake, and for no other reason.

'Twas John Keats who said, the sylvan historian, who can't express a flowery tale more sweetly than the rhyme knows, 'Truth is beauty, beauty truth,' and that is all we know on earth and all we need to know.

So ignore the cynic and the scientist who try to reduce it to mere words. Beauty is a thing we feel and know.

https://www.traditionsathome.com/shop/floral-flower-prints-propac-images/

Wednesday, January 10, 2018

What Will the New Year Bring?

2018


The first week of the New Year has passed and it is time again to ask, What will the New Year bring?



Donna Fargo

Donna Fargo?

As I sit down to write, the words from Donna Fargo's 1975 hit of the same name prances through my memory, "This past year was good to us the one before just a little rough. The one before that was an awful thing what will the new year bring? The past year was good to us." Call me country, call me corny, but I love Donna Fargo. I love songs about mistakes and tomorrow and forever, and walks together through life with the one you love.*
 

Old friends, New friends


Here in Overland Park we saw the departure of two employees, Missy went home to Oklahoma to be near her family, Alex took a great position in another field. That was rough for us, but we managed to find three new employees who add their own special charm to our staff.

In a week they are off to Manlius, New York to brave the snow and attend the Stickley Dealer Training seminar. We hope they stay warm while they learn all about Stickley including its new Studio by Stickley Collection.

See it now.


Studio by Stickley


It is new to us. It is an eclectic mix of styles - Modern Loft, Shackleford, Feng Shui, Mid-Century,... , in mixed materials, oak, ash, walnut, and metal, with a great selection of new finishes.


 

2018 Stickley Collector's Piece


Stickley is calling the new year the Year of the Dragonfly in honor of its new 2018 collector's piece, a Harvey Ellis Drop Front Desk with dragonfly inlay. It is stunning, available in cherry and oak and with all the beautiful Stickley hand-rubbed finishes. Plus there is a slat-back upright chair to go with the desk, again with the remarkable dragonfy inlay.



See it now.







Stickley Road Show


I have to mention Mike Danial's return to Overland Park and Wichita for the Stickley Road Show in February. Always entertaining, always informative, Mike is our favorite speaker. The event is limited so call the store for details.


What will the New Year bring?


One doesn't really know what surprises are in store, but that is what makes life exciting and interesting. We hope you will join us.

And we wish you a healthy and prosperous New Year!

 

* Looking forward also means looking back. Donna Fargo was born in Mt. Airy, North Carolina, fictional home of Andy Griffith's Mayberry. She had an unlikely climb to stardom, but in the 1970's if you were alive, you were singing along to one of her many hits, including the Happiest Girl in the Whole USA, which launched her career. 







Saturday, August 26, 2017

Another season is ending

Another season is ending, we know because Labor Day is just around the corner. 


the end of the season

Montana

One last vacation and a dip in the lake.

One last trip to Whitefish, Montana, then south towards Missoula, where fires still burn in the forest, (the locals say it always burns in August in Montana). Stop along Flathead Lake and watch fire suppressing helicopters load up with water to douse the flames.

Bigfork, Montana

Then stop at Bigfork, where in a quaint bookstore I find a used copy of Bright Orange for the Shroud, a Travis McGee novel by John D. MacDonald, and the store owner and I talk of pottery, which is his passion. Everyone has time to talk in Montana.

Happyland

Then down the road to the Raven for brisk swim in the cool lake, a beer and lunch. The smiling guests are talkative, the beer cold, the food nourishing, and the swim in the lake exhilarating.

Where are you from? I asked.

Michigan, Pennsylvania, California, Texas, Georgia, even Paris, France came the replies. And scattered among the hundreds who came and stayed, are a lucky few born and raised in Montana.

Happyland, I renamed the state for everyone seems to smile.

Montanan


Only a fool would leave.

I love Kansas

Don't get me wrong. I love Kansas. It is a great place to raise a family, but mountains and cool blue lakes, it has not. So, I must travel and extol the virtues of Kansas elsewhere. Ad astra per astra. Hard work is okay, and hard work gets me to Montana where I like to play.


Raven, Bigfork, Montana
Flathead Lake

Now, imagine my pleasant surprise when coming back to find the Kansas weather in the 70s and 80's.

If I close my eyes, I imagine I am still in Montana sitting at the Raven beside Flathead Lake, near Bigfork. A smile comes to my face.


Flathead Lake, Montana



Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Prairie Style

May Sale on Stickley

It is already May in the Midwest, the tulips and daffodils have gone, the wheat and corn is in the fields, and it's time for our Last chance to buy Stickley at 2016 prices. Our great pricing makes this a wonderful opportunity to freshen up the bungalow, craftsman home, or whatever style house you have.

Stickley the new Studio Collection

Prairie Style Architecture and Furniture


There is a fertile piece of land in America that stretches from the Appalachian Mountains west to the Rockies, which eastern dwelling city folk find strange because it is both simple and natural.



Traveling across this green and fruited plain and dressed in suits and finery, these city folk must have wondered who could leave behind the wonders of the industrial age for this wasteland. But to the God-fearing and hard-working Americans who lived here, this was their paradise.

One took delight in the rising and setting of the sun. The milkman delivered fresh milk. The egg man newly laid eggs. And a corner grocery store stocked necessary sundries. Screen doors banged throughout the day as children came and went, headed out to an empty lot to play baseball, or coming home to cookies and milk, and backyard fences were gathering places for good neighbors to talk while the laundry was hung to dry.

A Midwesterner by birth, Gustav Stickley settled in upstate New York, deep within the forest of the Allegheny Mountains at the western edge of the Appalachias, in a region called the Fingerlakes. There eons ago, glaciers left their mark carving out the beautiful lakes that give the area its name. And there, Gustav Stickley found his inspiration in nature, establishing the American Arts and Crafts Movement and creating the Prairie Style that would become better known as Mission Style, perhaps because of its association with California. In his magazine, Stickley preferred the use of Prairie Style and Craftsman Home, but he acknowledged the influence of the California Missions because of their simplicity in style and decoration.




Like Henry Ford and his Model T, Stickley new Prairie Style was meant for working-class families and those who loved the simplicity of well-made homes and furniture. The home that Stickley designed and featured in The Craftsman Magazine was called the bungalow, or more aptly, the American Bungalow. It was inexpensive to build, practical to live in, and easy to maintain. And because this was the age before television, there was always a front porch where at the end of the day, neighbors exchange the news of the day.



The popularity of the Prairie Style was immediate. Plans could be found in Stickley’s magazine and even entire homes could be purchased from a Sears catalog; and Craftsman homes cropped up like wheat from the suburbs of Chicago to California, where in Pasadena, the Greene and Greene brothers gave the style their own unique twist.

Pasadena Bungalow bed by Stickley


The furniture that Gustav Stickley designed for these homes was both “simple and honest”. This was a term Gustav Stickley interpreted to mean that it was made of natural native woods like oak and cherry, that the construction was always handmade, using time honored techniques. Stickley’s classic designs include the Prairie Settle and Prairie Bed. Borrowing a design from noted English designer William Morris, Stickley redesigned and improved the Stickley Morris chair in several variations including the beautiful bow arm reclining chair.



In 1904, Stickley was joined by architect Harvey Ellis, who added an element of refinement to the furniture, graceful arches, and delicate inlays. You can see the full line of Prairie Style furniture at Traditions Furniture in Overland Park and in Wichita, Kansas.

Visit Traditions Home


Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Timeless thoughts

I caught an episode of Timeless last night.



I had just returned from Dallas, and before that from Belgium and France, and just prior to my future plans to leave for Colorado and after that to Las Vegas. The television series about a stolen time machine seems appropriate for one, like me, who travels a lot. Sorting out the story line was, again, for me, difficult. Three protagonists all have their own agenda. A villain has a lot going on and his life story is seemingly contradictory. In the midst of the drama, the web of history is spun out, retelling tales that are true and semi-true. Reality conflates with perception.

Rewriting history is the goal, but for what reason?

It is autumn, when the good times of today, are the sad thoughts of tomorrow. It is a Bob Marley quote that has nothing to do with autumn. Still, it is a wonderful observation about time and change. What is good today is sad tomorrow. Spring and summer have come and gone. A walk by the lake with the dogs is a passing memory, one that I can almost reach out and touch, but not quite.