Friday, August 12, 2011

The Morris Bow Arm Recliner



The Morris Bow Arm Recliner

William Morris (1834 - 1896) was one of the leading architects of the English Arts and Crafts Movement. Gustav Stickley (1858 -1942), the father of American Arts and Crafts acknowledged his indebtedness to Morris' ideals and concepts.





It was William Morris who deserves credit as the father of all reclining chairs by inserting pegs into a chair frame allowing the back to recline.

But it was Gustav Stickley who redesigned the chair making it both functional and beautiful. Gracefully curve the arm of the chair to conform to the contour of the body. Utilize quarter-sawn oak with its natural flaking pattern. Apply varnish and lacquer to highlight the unique grain pattern. Employ mortise and tenon joinery that strengthens the construction and demonstrates the talent of the craftsman who built the chair.

Gustav Stickley first produced the Morris chair in 1904. Over the years there have been many imitators, but none have surpassed the quality and beauty of the Stickley Morris chair. Today, that tradition of craftsmanship and attention to detail continues in the company still called Stickley Furniture, located in Manlius, upstate New York.

Tsuba Chair

Over the years, Stickley Furniture has continued to innovate and refine both its style and method of production to improve on quality and design. One innovation has been the adaption of the Bow Arm Recliner to the style of Stickley's Pasadena Bungalow Collection.


Let's talk value.

Here is one of Gustav Stickley’s most famous designs - the Bow Arm Morris Chair,  made by Gustav Stickley from 1901 to 1916 and still made today by the L. & J.G. STICKLEY of Manlius , New, York. The arched arms, pluralized by the arch along the seat apron gave this chair a little more sensitivity than Stickley’s straight lined recliners. How do you put a price on comfort and styling?

Discover what Sotheby's sold an original Bow Arm Morris Recliner for in 2010 by visiting Stickley's Antique of the Week Archive.

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